Mail Services as MIT

Some rough numbers from MIT Mail Services, http://web.mit.edu/facilities/services/mail/mailing.html
  • MIT delivers an average of 16304 pieces daily in US and Interdepartmental mail, totaling over 4,000,000 pieces per year.
  • MIT delivers an average of 454 pieces of accountable mail daily, totaling 10,442 monthly.
  • MIT collects from 120 collection boxes throughout campus and then processes through nearly half a million pieces per year through their meters, with a daily average of 1863 pieces and yearly revenue of over $400,000.

If you are expecting an urgent package, please contact TIG via ops@csail.mit.edu as early as possible in the day.

It becomes increasingly more difficult to track down packages after 2:30PM EST.

Please be sure to include the following information when reporting a lost package or alerting us to something you are critically awaiting.

 
   * Sender's name and address
   * How the sender addressed the package
   * Delivery service, (UPS, USPS, Fed Ex, Freight Forwarding Company) 
   * The tracking information provided by the delivery company.
   * The rough deminsions (height, depth, length, and weight of the package.
   *  all of this information will help us help you faster 

1. United States Postal Service (USPS)

Individual MIT buildings (with a few exceptions, Stata is not one of the exceptions) are not serviced directly by the United States Postal Service. In fact, most of our buildings are not even on a postal route. This means that the letter carriers do not even enter our buildings. If a street address for one of our buildings is given as an address, it is not unusual, for the package to be delayed up to two days since it needs to be routed through WW-15.

If you wish to have something delivered to campus via USPS, the address on the envelope should be (see example:
Anthony Zolnik
MIT CSAIL
77 Mass Ave, 32-273  
Cambridge, MA 02139

-Exceptions: The MIT policy for "Accountable" US mail (things that require a signature: Express Mail, Certified Mail, Registered Mail but not delivery confirmation mail) is as follows:

"If MIT Mail Services signs for something, then the customer will also need to sign for it. If MIT Mail services does not sign for it, then it is considered first class mail and delivered according to the normal procedures, for CSAIL this is a daily bulk dropoff that TIG will sort and deliver.

As far as MIT and the USPS is concerned Priority Mail, delivery confirmation mail, and first class mail are all *standard mail

--> The term delivery confirmation mail is a complete misnomer in an university environment because the Post Office delivers packages to us in bulk, so they scan items as "delivered" and are then placed into a large rolling bin to be trucked over to WW-15. The confusion this causes is that a piece may say delivered when tracked via the USPS website, but in fact it is still sitting in the main Cambridge Post Office. This is especially difficult if the mail arrives right before or after a holiday.

2. United Parcel Service (UPS)

-For CSAIL, the first United Parcel Service mail/packages delivery is brought directly to the mail room in the basement. TIG retrieves this mail, sorts and then delivers it by 1PM. We are then called after the afternoon delivery arrives and we repeat the process above.

3. Federal Express (Fed EX)

-For CSAIL, the first Fed Ex mail/package delivery is brought directly to the mail room in the basement. TIG retrieves this mail, sorts and then delivers it by 1PM. We are then called after the afternoon delivery arrives and we repeat the process above.

For both UPS and Fed Ex, the proper way to have your package addressed is as follows:
Anthony Zolnik
MIT CSAIL
32 Vassar Street, 32-273
Cambridge, MA 02139

4. DHL --- Please use Fed EX for international shipping

* Please be sure to include letter G for Gates tower or D for Dreyfoos tower.
Topic revision: 04 Feb 2010, BrytBradley
 

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